ABOUT FIRST

FIRST (For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology) is an American nonprofit organization founded in 1989, whose main goal is connecting children and teens to science and technology. The organization does this through robotics competitions for groups of all ages, from children in preschool to high school students.

One of the organization’s goals is to imprint values such as leadership, teamwork, sportsmanship, self-confidence and communication in the students participating in the program.
Dean Kamen, FIRST's founder, wanted to create a program which would combine sports and technology, and would inspire students to perform acts of leadership and pursue a future in science and technology.

ABOUT FRC

FRC- (FIRST Robotics Competition) is the competiton FIRST offers to high school students. The competition begins on the first Saturday of every January, when teams worldwide (there are approximately 4000 FRC teams) receive the year’s challenge and guidelines, from NASA’s live feed. From that moment, each team has 6 and a half weeks, in which they need to plan, sketch, manufacture, build, code, and connect electronics to their robot.

At the end of the build season, regional competitions are held around the world. The competition is played as several matches between 2 alliances, which each have 3 robots. The comptitions are 3 days long- training day; qualification day, at the end of which all robots are ranked by their match results; and finals day. Finals are played in a best out of 3 method. The winning alliance in every regional advances to the FRC Championship, which is held in the United States.

FRC Games (since orbit foundation)

2005 - Triple Play

This game was the first to feature three robots per alliance. The primary game pieces were called "Tetras" which are tetrahedra made from PVC pipes. The game was played on a field set up like a tic-tac-toe board, with nine larger goals, also shaped as tetras. The object of the game was to place the scoring tetras on the larger goals, creating rows of three by having a tetra of your alliance’s color at the highest point on the goal. 

Tetras scored on the top of a goal were worth 3 points, while tetras contained inside the goals were worth 1 point. A goal was "owned" by the alliance whose color tetra highest on or inside the goal. Rows of three owned goals garnered the alliance an additional 10 points per at the end of regulation play. Ten points could also be scored if all three alliance robots were behind the alliance line at their end of the field at the end of the game.

 

2006 - Aim High

Aim High is played by two alliances, red and blue, each consisting of three robots. During a 10-second autonomous mode robots are programmed to score into any of the three goals: one raised center goal marked and two corner goals at floor level. Rounds two, three and four are each 40 seconds long and are human-controlled rounds. At the start of round 4 any alliance can score into the corresponding goals. At the end of the match any alliance can receive bonus points by placing its three robots on a platform below the center goal. The alliance with the most points wins with scoring as follows: 3 points for any ball scored in the center goal, 1 point for any ball scored in the corner goals, 10 bonus points for scoring the highest in the autonomous round and 25 points for placing all 3 robots on the platform at the end (10 points for 2 robots and 5 points for 1 robot).

2006 - Aim High

 
 

2007 - Rack 'n Roll

The challenge was focused on the middle of the playing field this time, with a huge rack made of eight columns of three spider leg-like arms. The alliances' objective was to score as many inflated rings, known as “ringers,” on the spider legs as possible. In the autonomous portion of this challenge, robots could earn bonus points for their alliance if they scored “keepers,” which were ringers only used in autonomous rounds, on the rack.

Teams earned more points for putting them on in rows or columns. Near the end of the round, alliances could earn bonus points by lifting teammates off of the ground.

 

2008 - FIRST Overdrive

FIRST Overdrive is played on a 54 ft by 27 ft carpeted field, divided lengthwise by a fence median to create a track, and separate the field into Red and Blue zones. The fence is crossed by an overpass marking the red and blue finish lines, and hold the game pieces: 40 inch diameter inflated balls called "Trackballs". Two three-team alliances race around the track in a counter clockwise direction while manipulating the trackballs to score points.

The game is made up of two scoring periods. The first 15 seconds of play is the Hybrid period in which robots are autonomous, and may also respond to certain digital signals sent by team members designated as "Robocoaches", who are stationed at the corners of the track.

The next two minutes of play is the Teleoperated period. At this time, robots are fully radio controlled by the team operators standing at either end of the field.

 

2009 - Lunacy

Lunacy is played on a 27 ft by 54 ft rectangular field. This field floor is referred to as 'Regolith'. The regolith is designed to interact with robots, which must use a special mandatory wheel that may not be altered, to have reduced traction. This is supposed to mirror the effect of driving with low gravity on the moon.

Lunacy is played by two alliances of three robots each. The objective of the game is to score points by placing moon rocks (worth 2 points when scored) in the opposing alliance's trailers, which are dragged around by each robot. Empty cells (worth 20 points when scored) may be delivered to human players to be used later as "super cells". During the last 20 seconds of a match, supercells (worth 15 points when scored) may be put into play. 

The name and some of the features of the game honor the 40th anniversary of the first manned mission to the Moon (Latin: Luna).

 
 

2010 - Breakaway

Robots play Breakaway on a 27 by 54-foot rectangular field known as the field. The field is bordered by a set of guardrails and alliance walls. There are two "bumps" in the field that divide it into three zones. During matches, the robots are controlled from alliance stations located outside the field at both ends. These rectangular zones consist of three-team player stations that provide connectivity between the controls used by the robot operators and the arena. Goals are located at the corners of the field, and extend behind the alliance wall and adjacent to the player stations. After goals are scored, human players must pick up the balls and pass them to the center of the alliance station to be placed on a ball return rack, after which they will re-enter play at midfield. Teams are penalized if balls are not re-entered within a set time limit.

 

2011 - Logomotion

The game is played on a 27-foot by 54-foot rectangular field. Playing pieces are inner tubes shaped like the components of the FIRST logo. The primary objective of the game is to place them on racks to gain points. In the endgame, robots deploy smaller robots (“minibots”) to climb a tower. Minibots must be made from the FIRST Tech Challenge kit of parts. The game celebrates the 20th season of the FRC and is also meant to commemorate the artist Jack Kamen, who designed the original FIRST logo

2011 - Logomotion

The game is played on a 27-foot by 54-foot rectangular field. Playing pieces are inner tubes shaped like the components of the FIRST logo. The primary objective of the game is to place them on racks to gain points. In the endgame, robots deploy smaller robots (“minibots”) to climb a tower. Minibots must be made from the FIRST Tech Challenge kit of parts. The game celebrates the 20th season of the FRC and is also meant to commemorate the artist Jack Kamen, who designed the original FIRST logo

 

2012 - Rebound Rumble

The field is a carpeted area 27 feet by 54 feet designed to mimic a basketball court. At both ends are the driver stations and an array of basketball hoops.There is one low hoop, two middle hoops, and one high hoop.

The game is played by two alliances, red and blue, of three teams each. Alliances compete in 135-second matches to earn as many points as possible by scoring basketballs into hoops or by balancing tilt bridges. Robots start a match in contact with their key, the semicircular plastic area approximately at the free-throw line.  Each match lasts 135 seconds and is divided into two portions: Hybrid mode and Teleop mode. During Hybrid mode, two robots on each alliance have to act autonomously, while the third may be controlled by means of a Microsoft Kinect or act autonomously. During Teleop, all robots are controlled by human drivers. 

 

2013 - Ultimate Ascent

Ultimate Ascent is played on a 27' x 54' field. There are two pyramids placed in the center of each half of the field. There are five scoring locations located on the opposite end of the field from the alliance station where that teams drivers are. Four of the goals are located on the opposing alliance's wall. The fifth is part of the pyramid at that end of the field.

Matches are two minutes and fifteen seconds long. The first fifteen seconds are called autonomous. Following this period the teams take control for the teleoperated period. Drivers control their robots, attempting to score discs into the goals at the opposite end of the playing field. The robots also can climb their alliance's pyramid at the end of the match to score additional points. In the final thirty seconds the human players can throw their six colored discs into play over the alliance wall.

 

Teams start with up to 2 or 3 discs on the robot at the beginning of the match. Robots which begin touching the carpet behind their colored Auto Line may have three discs; others may have only two. They can score these in autonomous or wait for the teleoperated period. Only the 6 discs of an alliance's color count when scored on top of its pyramid. White or opposing colored discs will not count if scored in the pyramid. Teams can score points as follows by scoring discs into goals. 

The match ends with robots attempting to climb pyramid game elements located on the field. Robots earn points by climbing the pyramid based on how high they climb. Levels are divided by the horizontal bars on the pyramid.

 

2014 - Aerial Assist

Aerial Assist is played on a 27' x 54' field.

In the game, the alliances win via getting the scoring elements (2'-diameter exercise balls) into the scoring areas located on the far end of the field. The game starts with each robots in either the White Zone (center field) or the goalie zones. They can be preloaded with 1 game ball prior to the start. The match begins with a 10-second autonomous period, where robots use the pre-programmed instructions to score points. These points are worth 5 more during the Autonomous period, and one goal will be lit up ("hot") during each half. That goal is worth 5 additional points, for a maximum total of a 10-point bonus. In addition, every robot that moves from the center to their own side of the field earns another five point bonus. When Tele-op starts, the teams take control of their respective robots. The cycle starts when a human player transfers a ball onto the playing field. The robots can then do either the basic goal score (take the ball to the other end of the field), or assist them in doing so. The recipient of the latter will earn bonus points (2 assists=10 points, 3 assists=30 points). Throwing the ball over the truss (the midpoint overhang) when transferring, a la volleyball, will add 10 additional points. Having an alliance partner catch it will earn 10 more points. A robot in the goalie zones can block shots via extending upwards.

 

2015 - Recycle Rush

The game is played on a 27' x 54' rectangular field.

The game begins with a 15-second autonomous period . During this period, alliances can gain 4 points if each robot moves into the Auto Zone, 6 points if they bring all three totes into the Auto Zone, 8 points if they bring all three barrels into the Auto Zone, and 20 if all three totes are stacked in the Auto Zone.[2] However, the strategy most often seen at regional events and the championship was often to grab the recycling bins located on the step in the middle of the field to "cap" the stacks during the teleoperated period.

Immediately after the autonomous round, drivers operate the robots via control stations at the ends of the field. During this time, they aim to use the robots to put "litter", represented by green pool noodles, in a Landfill Zone for 1 point apiece, place totes on a scoring platform for 2 points apiece, place litter inside barrels for 6 points per barrel, and put the barrels on top of scoring stacks of totes for 4 points per level (approximately one level per tote) measured from the lowest point of the barrel.

 

The game is played on a 27' x 54' rectangular field.

Stronghold is a medieval tower defense game in which two alliances of up to three teams each compete to score points by breaching the opponent's outer works and capturing the opponent's tower. Before the match, teams and the audience select defenses to fortify the alliance's outer works. Teams receive two ranking points in the competition standings for a win, and one ranking point for a tie.

Each match begins with a 15-second autonomous period. The match then transitions to a 2 minute and 15 second teleop period, where robots are driven by the drive teams.

Robots begin in the neutral zone with the ability to hold one boulder each. However, alliances may assign a "spy" robot to start in the opposing alliance's courtyard. Alliances earn 2 points for reaching the opposing alliance's outer works, and earn 10 points for crossing them. Any additional defenses a robot crosses in auto will not decrease a defense's strength, or give points to the alliance. Once across a defense, a robot in autonomous mode can score a high goal for 10 points or low goal for 5 points.

Robots retrieve boulders from either their secret passage or the mid line, overcome opponent defenses, and score goals in their opponent's courtyard. Robots may transport only one boulder at a time. Each time a robot crosses an undamaged defense, they receive 5 points. Robots earn 5 points for scoring a high goal, and 2 points for a low goal. In the last 20 seconds of the match, robots race to the opposing alliance's tower to either park on the batter, earning them 5 points for a challenge, or hang from the tower's rungs, earning them 15 points for a scale.

2016 - FIRST Stronghold

 

The game is played on a 27' x 54' rectangular field.

FIRST STEAMWORKS the 2017 FIRST Robotics Competition game, invites two adventure clubs from an era in which technology relied on steam power to prepare their airships for the ultimate long distance race.

Each three-team alliance prepares to take flight in three ways: 1. Build Steam Pressure. Robots collect fuel represented by green balls. They score it in high and low goals in their boiler. As fuel is scored steam pressure in the tank on the alliance’s airship builds – the high goal builds pressure faster than the low goal. 2. Start Rotors. Robots retrieve and deliver gears to pilots on their airship who then install them on the appropriate rotor. Once a gear train is complete the rotor can be started. 3. Prepare for Flight. Adventure clubs want their robots to climb aboard their airships so they can assist the pilots during the race.

Autonomous Period: Robots operate independently from preprogrammed instructions for the first 15 seconds. Adventure clubs score points by: • Reaching their baseline • Delivering gears to the airship • Scoring fuel into the boilers

Teleoperated Period: Operators take control for the final two minutes and fifteen seconds. Adventure Clubs continue to score points by: • Collecting and delivering gears to their airship • Scoring fuel in the boilers • Climbing the ropes on their airship to prepare for flight • Populating gear trains to start rotors • Defending against other Adventure Clubs The adventure club with the highest score at the end of the match is best prepared for the race and wins.

2017 - FIRST Steamworks

The game is played on a 27' x 54' rectangular field.

FIRST POWER UP, the 2018 FIRST Robotics Competition game, finds our teams trapped in an 8bit video game! Teams use power cubes to defeat the boss.

Each three-team alliance has three ways to help defeat the boss: 1. Owning the scale or their switch. Ownership occurs when the scale or alliance’s switch is tipped in their favor. Robots collect and deliver power cubes to gain ownership. 2. Playing power ups. Alliances exchange power cubes for power ups. Power ups provide a timed advantage during the match. There are three power ups that can be played: Force, Boost, and Levitate. 3. Climbing the scale tower. Robots work together to climb the scale tower to face the boss

Autonomous Period: Robots operate independently following preprogrammed instructions for the first fifteen seconds of the match. Alliances score points by: • Reaching their own autonomous line • Gaining ownership of the scale or their switch

Teleoperated Period: Operators take control for the final two minutes and fifteen seconds of the match. Alliances continue to score points by: • Gaining ownership of the scale or their switch • Delivering power cubes to the alliance’s vault • Using power ups for a timed advantage • Parking on the scale platform or climbing the scale to face the boss The alliance with the highest score at the end of the match defeats the boss and wins.

2018 - FIRST Power Up

FIRST-FRC18-PowerUp-Stack.png
 

The game is played on a 27' x 54' rectangular field.

FIRST POWER UP, the 2018 FIRST Robotics Competition game, finds our teams trapped in an 8bit video game! Teams use power cubes to defeat the boss.

Each three-team alliance has three ways to help defeat the boss: 1. Owning the scale or their switch. Ownership occurs when the scale or alliance’s switch is tipped in their favor. Robots collect and deliver power cubes to gain ownership. 2. Playing power ups. Alliances exchange power cubes for power ups. Power ups provide a timed advantage during the match. There are three power ups that can be played: Force, Boost, and Levitate. 3. Climbing the scale tower. Robots work together to climb the scale tower to face the boss

Autonomous Period: Robots operate independently following preprogrammed instructions for the first fifteen seconds of the match. Alliances score points by: • Reaching their own autonomous line • Gaining ownership of the scale or their switch

Teleoperated Period: Operators take control for the final two minutes and fifteen seconds of the match. Alliances continue to score points by: • Gaining ownership of the scale or their switch • Delivering power cubes to the alliance’s vault • Using power ups for a timed advantage • Parking on the scale platform or climbing the scale to face the boss The alliance with the highest score at the end of the match defeats the boss and wins.

2019- DESTINATION:

DEEP SPACE

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